Corporate Governance

Corporate Governance

Board Leadership Structure

Chairman of the Board: Andy D. Bryant

Chief Executive Officer: Brian M. Krzanich

Independent Lead Director: John J. Donahoe

Board Leadership Structure. We separate the roles of Board Chairman and CEO in order to aid in the Board’s oversight of management. This policy is embodied in the Board’s published Guidelines on Significant Corporate Governance Issues (also referred to in this proxy statement as our Corporate Governance Guidelines), and has been in effect since the company began operations.

Our current Board Chairman, Andy D. Bryant, has served in the role since May 2012. Mr. Bryant has never served as CEO. The independent directors selected Mr. Bryant to serve as Chairman because they determined that Mr. Bryant’s extensive experience at Intel and familiarity with Intel’s operations and management structure, as well as the Board’s confidence in Mr. Bryant’s guidance and ability to support the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities, uniquely positioned Mr. Bryant to fulfill the Chairman’s responsibilities.

Although Mr. Bryant is an executive of Intel, he and our CEO, Mr. Krzanich, each report directly to the Board and have different responsibilities. Mr. Krzanich, as Intel’s CEO, develops, reports to the Board on, and oversees implementation of, our business strategy, and is responsible for leading the company and managing its operations. As Chairman, Mr. Bryant serves as the liaison between the Board and management. Working with the Board’s independent Lead Director and with our CEO, Mr. Bryant helps to develop the Board’s meeting agendas and leads Board meetings so that they are both productive and efficient. His responsibilities include making sure that the Board receives timely information about important aspects of and developments affecting the company, serving as a resource for and adviser to senior management, and supporting the Board oversight of the company’s risk management, compliance and other governance functions.

The independent directors unanimously elected to approve an extension for Mr. Bryant to continue to serve as a corporate officer and director beyond age 65, notwithstanding the provisions of the company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines. The independent directors approved this extension in order to provide the company with leadership continuity.

In May 2016, the independent directors unanimously elected Mr. Donahoe to the position of independent Lead Director and he will continue to serve in that role until the date of the 2017 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting. After the 2017 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting, Mr. Bhusri will serve as the independent Lead Director. The duties and responsibilities of the independent Lead Director, as provided in our Bylaws and the Board’s Charter of the Lead Director, include:

  • serving as Chairman of the Board at meetings of the Board of Directors when the Chairman is not present; 
  • serving as Chairman of the Executive Committee and as Chairman or co-Chairman of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee of the Board of Directors; 
  • developing the agendas for and serving as Chairman of the executive sessions of the Board’s independent directors and, if different, the Board’s non-employee directors; 
  • advising the Chairman as to the quality, quantity, and timeliness of the information submitted by the company’s management that is necessary or appropriate for the non-employee directors to effectively and responsibly perform their duties; 
  • assisting the Board of Directors, the Board’s Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee, and the officers of the company in implementing and complying with the Board’s Guidelines on Significant Corporate Governance Issues; 
  • approving the information, agenda, and meeting schedules for the Board of Directors’ and Board committee meetings; 
  • calling and presiding at meetings of the independent directors; 
  • approving the retention of advisors and consultants who report directly to the Board; 
  • recommending to the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee and to the Chairman the membership of the various Board Committees, as well as the selection of committee chairmen; and 
  • serving as a liaison for consultation and direct communication with stockholders.

The independent directors periodically assess the Board’s leadership structure and will continue to evaluate and implement the leadership structure that they conclude most effectively supports the Board in fulfilling its responsibilities.

The Board’s Role in Risk Oversight at Intel

One of the Board’s important functions is oversight of risk management at Intel. Risk is inherent in business, and the Board’s oversight, assessment, and decisions regarding risks occur in the context of and in conjunction with the other activities of the Board and its committees.

Defining Risk. The Board and management consider “risk” to be the possibility that an undesired event could occur that might adversely affect the achievement of our objectives. Risks vary in many ways, including the ability of the company to anticipate and understand the risk, the types of adverse impacts that could result if the undesired event occurs, the likelihood that an undesired event and a particular adverse impact would occur, and the ability of the company to control the risk and the potential adverse impacts. Examples of the types of risks faced by Intel include:

  • macro-economic risks, such as inflation, deflation, reductions in economic growth, or recession; 
  • political risks, such as restrictions on access to markets, confiscatory taxation, or expropriation of assets; 
  • event risks, such as natural disasters; and 
  • business-specific risks related to strategic position, operational execution, financial structure, legal and regulatory compliance, corporate governance, and environmental stewardship.

Not all risks can be dealt with in the same way. Some risks may be readily perceived and controllable, while other risks are unknown; some risks can be avoided or mitigated by particular behavior, and some risks are unavoidable as a practical matter. In some cases, a decision may be made that a higher degree of risk may be acceptable because of a greater perceived potential for reward. Intel seeks to align its voluntary risk-taking with company strategy, and Intel understands that its projects and processes may enhance the company’s business interests by encouraging innovation and appropriate levels of risk-taking.

Risk Assessment Responsibilities and Processes

risk assessment graphic

The Board’s Role in Succession Planning

As reflected in our Corporate Governance Guidelines, the Board’s primary responsibilities include planning for CEO succession and monitoring and advising on management’s succession planning for other executive officers. The Board’s goal is to have a long-term and continuing program for effective senior leadership development and succession. The Board also has contingency plans in place for emergencies such as the departure, death, or disability of the CEO or other executive officers.

Director Independence and Transactions Considered in Independence Determinations

Director Independence. The Board has determined that each of the following non-employee directors qualifies as “independent” in accordance with the published listing requirements of NASDAQ: Ambassador Barshefsky, Mr. Bhusri, Mr. Donahoe, Mr. Hundt, Mr. Ishrak, Dr. Liu, Dr. Plummer, Mr. Pottruck, Mr. Smith, Mr. Yeary, and Dr. Yoffie. Because Mr. Krzanich and Mr. Bryant are employed by Intel, they do not qualify as independent. Susan L. Decker, who served as a director until the 2016 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting, was determined to be independent during the time she served on the Board.

The NASDAQ rules have objective tests and a subjective test for determining who is an “independent director.” Under the objective tests, a director cannot be considered independent if:

  • The director is, or at any time during the past three years was, an employee of the company;
  • The director or a family member of the director accepted any compensation from the company in excess of $120,000 during any period of 12 consecutive months within the three years preceding the independence determination (subject to certain exclusions, including, among other things, compensation for Board or Board committee service); 
  • A family member of the director is, or at any time during the past three years was, an executive officer of the company; 
  • The director or a family member of the director is a partner in, a controlling stockholder of, or an executive officer of an entity to which the company made, or from which the company received, payments in the current or any of the past three fiscal years that exceeded 5% of the recipient’s consolidated gross revenue for that year, or $200,000, whichever was greater (subject to certain exclusions); 
  • The director or a family member of the director is employed as an executive officer of an entity for which at any time during the past three years, any of the executive officers of the company served on the compensation committee of such other entity; or 
  • The director or a family member of the director is a current partner of the company’s outside auditor, or at any time during the past three years was a partner or employee of the company’s outside auditor, and who worked on the company’s audit.

The subjective test states that an independent director must be a person who lacks a relationship that, in the opinion of the Board, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director. The Board has not established categorical standards or guidelines to make these subjective determinations, but considers all relevant facts and circumstances.

In addition to the Board-level standards for director independence, the directors who serve on the Audit Committee each satisfy standards established by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), as no member of the Audit Committee accepts directly or indirectly any consulting, advisory, or other compensatory fee from the company other than their director compensation, or otherwise has an affiliate relationship with the company. Similarly, the members of the Compensation Committee each qualify as independent under the NASDAQ standards. Under these standards, the Board considered that none of the members of the Compensation Committee accept directly or indirectly any consulting, advisory, or other compensatory fee from the company other than their director compensation, and that none have any affiliate relationships with the company or other relationships that would impair the director’s judgment as a member of the Compensation Committee.

Transactions Considered in Independence Determinations. In making its independence determinations, the Board considered transactions that occurred since the beginning of 2014 between Intel and entities associated with the independent directors or members of their immediate families.

All of the non-employee directors qualified as “independent” under the objective tests. In making its subjective determination that each non-employee director is independent, the Board reviewed and discussed additional information provided by the directors and the company with regard to each director’s business and personal activities as they may relate to Intel and Intel’s management. The Board considered the transactions in the context of the NASDAQ objective standards, the special standards established by the SEC and NASDAQ for members of audit and compensation committees, and the special SEC and U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) standards for compensation committee members. Based on this review, as required by the NASDAQ rules, the Board made a subjective determination that, based on the nature of the directors’ relationships with the entity and/or the amount involved, no relationships exist that, in the opinion of the Board, impair the directors’ independence. The Board’s independence determinations took into account the following transactions:

Business Relationships. Each of our non-employee directors or one of his or her immediate family members is, or was during the previous three fiscal years, a non-management director, trustee, advisor, or executive or served in a similar position at another entity that did business with Intel at some time during those years. The business relationships were ordinary course dealings as a supplier or purchaser of goods or services; licensing or research arrangements; facility, engineering, and equipment fees; or commercial paper or similar financing arrangements in which Intel or an affiliate participated as a creditor. Payments to or from each of these entities constituted less than the greater of $200,000 or 1% of each of Intel’s and the recipient’s annual revenue, respectively, in each of the past three years, except as discussed below.

  • Ambassador Barshefsky is a Partner at the law firm Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP (WilmerHale). Ambassador Barshefsky does not provide any legal services to Intel, and she does not receive any compensation from the firm that is generated by or related to our payments to the firm. Intel engages a number of law firms, and has engaged WilmerHale in various significant matters since 1997, before Ambassador Barshefsky joined either the firm or Intel’s Board. Recognizing that proxy advisory firms have questioned professional advisory relationships between companies and a director’s firm, the Board carefully reviewed the nature of Intel’s engagement of WilmerHale and the services rendered, including the expertise and relevant experience of the firm, the firm’s and specific partners’ knowledge of Intel and its business and past legal engagements, and the fees paid in such engagements, and determined that Ambassador Barshefsky’s service on Intel’s Board should not impair Intel’s ability to engage WilmerHale when Intel determines such engagements to be in the best interest of Intel and its stockholders. The Board is satisfied that WilmerHale, when engaged for legal work, is chosen by Intel’s legal group on the basis of the directly relevant factors of experience, expertise, and efficiency. The fees and expenses paid to WilmerHale represented less than 5% of the firm’s annual revenue in each of the past three years, and represented less than 0.1% of Intel’s revenue in each year. After considering these fees and expenses, and being briefed on the policies and procedures that WilmerHale has instituted to confirm that Ambassador Barshefsky has no professional involvement or financial interest in Intel’s dealings with the firm, the Board (with Ambassador Barshefsky recused) unanimously determined that Intel’s professional engagement of WilmerHale does not impair Ambassador Barshefsky’s independence.
  • Mr. Bhusri is CEO and director of Workday, Inc. (Workday), a company with which Intel engages in ordinary course business transactions. The Board carefully reviewed the nature of Intel’s transactions with Workday, which primarily related to human resource management solutions contract and software subscription services, and Mr. Bhusri’s position as CEO and executive director at Workday. The fees paid Workday represented less than 2% of Workday’s annual revenue in each of the past two years, and represented less than .03% of Intel’s revenue in each year. After considering these fees, the Board (with Mr. Bhusri recused) unanimously determined that Intel’s business transactions with Workday do not impair Mr. Bhusri’s independence.
  • Mr. Bhusri is a member of the board of directors of Cloudera, Inc. (Cloudera), a company with which Intel holds over 10%ownership interest and engages in ordinary course business transactions. The Board carefully reviewed the nature of Intel’s transactions with Cloudera, which primarily related to subscription licenses and software support services, and Mr. Bhusri’s position as a non-management director at Cloudera. The fees paid Cloudera represented less than 3.6% of Cloudera’s annual revenue in each of the past three years, and represented less than 0.02% of Intel’s revenue in each year. After considering these fees, the Board (with Mr. Bhusri recused) unanimously determined that Intel’s business transactions with Cloudera do not impair Mr. Bhusri’s independence.
  • Dr. Plummer is a member of the board of directors of Cadence Design Systems (Cadence), a company with which Intel engages in ordinary course business transactions. The Board carefully reviewed the nature of Intel’s transactions with Cadence, which primarily related to electronic design automation software services, and technology contracts, and Dr. Plummer’s position as a non-management director at Cadence. The fees paid Cadence represented less than 5.4% of Cadence’s annual revenue in each of the past three years, and represented less than 0.2% of Intel’s revenue in each year. After considering these fees, the Board (with Dr. Plummer recused) unanimously determined that Intel’s business transactions with Cadence do not impair Dr. Plummer’s independence.

Charitable Contributions. Mr. Hundt, Dr. Plummer, Mr. Pottruck, Dr. Yoffie, or one of their immediate family members is serving, or has each served during the previous three fiscal years, as an executive, professor, or other employee for one or more colleges or universities or as a director, executive, or employee of a charitable entity that received matching or other charitable contributions from Intel during those years. Charitable contributions to each of these entities (including matching and discretionary contributions by Intel and the Intel Foundation) constituted less than $120,000 in each of the past three years, as discussed below.

  • Mr. Hundt was a member of the Advisory Board for the Yale School of Management, the graduate business school of Yale University, from 1996 until 2014. The Intel Foundation contributed less than $5,000 in 2014 to match Intel employee charitable contributions to Yale University, amounting to less than 0.001% of Yale University’s consolidated annual revenue for 2014. 
  • Dr. Plummer is a Professor of Electrical Engineering, and was the Dean of the School of Engineering at Stanford University from 1999 until 2014. The Intel Foundation contributed less than $20,000 in each of the past three years to match Intel employee charitable contributions to Stanford University and employee volunteer hours at Stanford under the Intel Involved Matching Grant Program. 
  • Mr. Pottruck is a Senior Fellow, Advisory Board Member, and Lecturer at the Wharton School of Business of the University of Pennsylvania. The Intel Foundation contributed less than $15,000 in each of the past three years to match Intel employee charitable contributions to the University of Pennsylvania, amounting to less than 0.001% of the University of Pennsylvania’s consolidated annual revenue for each of the past three years. 
  • Dr. Yoffie is a Professor at Harvard Business School, the graduate business school of Harvard University. The Intel Foundation contributed less than $5,000 in 2014 and 2015 to match Intel employee charitable contributions to Harvard University, amounting to less than 0.001% of Harvard’s consolidated annual revenue for each year.

Director Tenure

If each of the nominees are elected to the Board, after the 2017 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting our directors will have served an average of 8.8 years on the Board, and seven of our directors have been on the Board for less than that period of time. Additionally, the Board will have four non-employee directors with less than five years of experience and five non-employee directors with more than five years of experience. This mix of tenure on the Board is intended to support the view that the Board as a whole represents a “portfolio” of new perspectives and the deep institutional knowledge of longer-tenured directors.

intel-director-tenure

Corporate Governance Guidelines

Intel has long maintained a set of governance guidelines, titled the Board of Directors Guidelines on Significant Corporate Governance Issues. The Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee reviews the guidelines annually and recommends amendments to the Board as appropriate. The Board oversees administration and interpretation of, and compliance with, the guidelines and may amend, waive, suspend, or repeal any of the guidelines at any time, with or without public notice subject to legal requirements, as it determines necessary or appropriate in the exercise of the Board’s judgment in its role as fiduciary.

Investors may find these guidelines on our web site at www.intel.com/governance, which address, among other matters, the following Board practices:

✔ WHAT WE DO✗ WHAT WE DON'T DO
  • Separate Chair and CEO positions and appoint either independent Lead Director or independent Chair
  • No director may serve on more than three other U.S. public company boards (two, if also serving as a CEO)
  • Annual self-evaluations for individual directors and the Board as a whole
  • No independent director is expected to stand for re-election after age 72 without prior Board approval
  • Independent directors meet in executive session at least three times a year
  • No restrictions on directors’ access to management or employees
  • Seek out women and minority candidates as well as candidates with diverse backgrounds, experiences and skills as part of each Board search

Director Attendance

The Board held six regularly scheduled meetings and five special meetings in 2016. As shown in the Board Committee chart below, committees of the Board also held a total of 22 meetings during 2016, with the Finance Committee holding a regularly scheduled meeting and each other committee holding a number of regularly scheduled and special meetings. We expect each director to attend every meeting of the Board and the committees on which he or she serves. Each director attended at least 75% of the meetings of the Board and each committee on which he or she served in 2016 (held during the period in which the director served). The Board’s policy is that directors should endeavor to attend the annual stockholders’ meeting, and all of the then-incumbent directors other than Ambassador Barshefsky and Mr. Pottruck attended the 2016 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting.

Board Responsibilities and Committees

Board Responsibilities. The Board oversees, counsels, and directs management in the long-term interests of the company and our stockholders. The Board’s responsibilities include:

  • overseeing the conduct of our business and the assessment of our business and other enterprise risks to evaluate whether the business is being properly managed; 
  • planning for CEO succession and monitoring management’s succession planning for other executive officers; 
  • reviewing and approving our major financial objectives, strategic, and operating plans, and other significant actions; 
  • selecting the CEO, evaluating CEO performance, and determining the compensation of the CEO and other executive officers; and 
  • overseeing our processes for maintaining the integrity of our financial statements and other public disclosures, and our compliance with law and ethics.

The Board and its committees met throughout the year on a set schedule, held special meetings, and acted by written consent from time to time as appropriate. At each Board meeting, time is reserved for the independent directors to meet without the Chairman and CEO present. Officers regularly attend Board meetings to present information on our business and strategy, and Board members have worldwide access to our employees outside of Board meetings. Board members are encouraged to make site visits on a worldwide basis to meet with local management; to attend Intel industry, analyst, and other major events; and to accept invitations to attend and speak at internal Intel meetings.

Board Committees. The Board assigns responsibilities and delegates authority to its committees, and the committees regularly report on their activities and actions to the full Board. The Board has five standing committees: Audit, Compensation, Corporate Governance and Nominating, Executive, and Finance. Each committee can engage outside experts, advisors, and counsel to assist the committee in its work.

Each committee, and the Lead Director, has a written charter approved by the Board. We post each charter in the Corporate Governance section of our web site at www.intc.com/committees-charters.

The following table identifies the current committee members. As discussed above, the Board has determined that each member of the Audit, Compensation, and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committees is an independent director in accordance with NASDAQ standards.

[committee members table here]

committee member
Committee Member
committee chair
Committee Chair/Co-Chair
1 John J. Donahoe is not standing for re-election, and James D. Plummer is retiring from the Board of Directors. Messrs. Donahoe’s and Plummer’s terms expire at the 2017 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting.

AUDIT COMMITTEE

  • Assists the Board in its general oversight of our financial reporting, financial risk assessment, internal controls, and audit functions. 
  • Responsible for appointing and retaining our independent registered public accounting firm, managing its compensation, and overseeing its work.

The Board has determined that Mr. Yeary qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” under SEC rules and that each Audit Committee member is sufficiently proficient in reading and understanding the company’s financial statements to serve on the Audit Committee. The responsibilities and activities of the Audit Committee are described in detail in “Report of the Audit Committee” in this proxy statement and the Audit Committee’s charter.

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE

  • Reviews and determines salaries, performance-based incentives, and other matters related to the compensation of our executive officers. 
  • Reviews and grants equity awards to our executive officers. 
  • Reviews and determines other compensation policies, handles many compensation-related matters, and makes recommendations to the Board and to management on employee compensation and benefit plans.
  • Makes recommendations to the Board on stockholder proposals about compensation matters. 
  • Administers the equity incentive plan and the employee stock purchase plan.

The Compensation Committee is responsible for determining compensation for Intel executives (including our CEO and our Chairman), while the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee recommends to the full Board the compensation for non-employee directors. The Compensation Committee can designate one or more of its members to perform duties on its behalf, subject to reporting to or ratification by the Compensation Committee, and can delegate to other Board members, or an officer or officers of the company, the authority to review and grant stock-based compensation for employees who are not executive officers.

The Compensation Committee retains an independent executive compensation consultant, Farient Advisors LLC (Farient), to provide input, analysis, and advice about Intel’s executive compensation philosophy, peer groups, pay positioning (by pay component and in total) relative to peer companies, compensation design, equity usage and allocation, and risk assessment under Intel’s compensation programs. Farient reports directly to the Compensation Committee and interacts with management at the committee’s direction. Farient did not perform work for Intel in 2016 except under its engagement by the Compensation Committee, and it provided the committee with a report covering factors specified in SEC rules regarding potential conflicts of interest arising from the consultant’s work. Based on this report and its discussions with Farient, the committee determined that Farient’s work in 2016 did not raise any conflicts of interest.

The CEO makes recommendations to the Compensation Committee on the base salary, annual incentive cash targets, and equity awards for all executive officers other than himself and the Chairman of the Board. These recommendations are based on his assessment of each executive officer’s performance during the year and his review of compensation surveys. For more information on the responsibilities and activities of the Compensation Committee, including the processes for determining executive compensation, see “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Report of the Compensation Committee,” and “Executive Compensation” in this proxy statement, and the Compensation Committee’s charter (available at www.intc.com/committees-charters).

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND NOMINATING COMMITTEE

  • Reviews matters of corporate governance and corporate responsibility, such as environmental, sustainability, workplace, political contributions, and stakeholder issues, and periodically reports on these matters to the Board. 
  • Annually reviews and assesses the effectiveness of the Board’s Corporate Governance Guidelines, recommends to the Board proposed revisions to the Guidelines and committee charters, and reviews the poison pill policy. 
  • Makes recommendations to the Board regarding the size and composition of the Board and its committees. 
  • Reviews all stockholder proposals and recommends actions on such proposals. 
  • Advises the Board on compensation for our non-employee directors.

The Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee also establishes procedures for Board nominations and recommends candidates for election to the Board. Consideration of new Board candidates typically involves a series of internal discussions, review of candidate information, and interviews with selected candidates. Board members typically suggest candidates for nomination to the Board. In addition to candidates identified by Board members, the committee considers candidates proposed by stockholders and evaluates them using the same criteria. A stockholder who wishes to suggest a candidate for the committee’s consideration should send the candidate’s name and qualifications to our Corporate Secretary. The Corporate Secretary’s contact information can be found in this proxy statement under the heading “Other Matters; Communicating with Us.” During 2016, the Board retained and paid fees to a third-party search firm to assist in the processes of identifying and evaluating potential Board candidates, consistent with the committee’s criteria.

In screening director candidates, regardless of whether they are identified by current Board members, stockholders or third-party search firms, the committee considers the diversity of skills, experience, and background of the Board as a whole and, based on that analysis, determines whether it would strengthen the Board to add a director with a certain type of background, experience, personal characteristics, or skills. In particular, the committee considers factors such as independence; understanding of and experience in manufacturing, technology, finance, and marketing; international experience; age; and gender and ethnic diversity, which includes its commitment to actively seek women and minority candidates for the pool from which board candidates are chosen. In connection with this process, the committee also seeks input from Intel’s head of Global Diversity and Inclusion.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

  • Exercises the authority of the Board between Board meetings, except as limited by applicable law.

FINANCE COMMITTEE

  • Advises the Board on capital structure decisions, including the issuance and management of debt and equity securities; and banking arrangements, including the investment of corporate cash.
  • Reviews and approves finance and other cash-management transactions.

Communications from Stockholders to Directors

The Board recommends that stockholders initiate communications with the Board, the Chairman, or any Board committee by writing to our Corporate Secretary. You can find the address in the “Other Matters” section of this proxy statement. This process assists the Board in reviewing and responding to stockholder communications. The Board has instructed our Corporate Secretary to review correspondence directed to the Board and, at the Corporate Secretary’s discretion, to forward items that she deems to be appropriate for the Board’s consideration.

Title Goes Here